Waiting times at St Mary's NHS Treatment Centre

First appointment From appointment to treatment*
5 weeks 3 weeks
*The actual time you wait for surgery at St Mary's NHS Treatment Centre will depend on many factors, including whether further diagnostics or tests are required, patient choice and how quickly the NHS will approve the funding for your treatment. Nevertheless the vast majority will be in the range detailed above.

Please note: waiting times displayed are indicative and can change on a daily basis.


You have the right to choose where you have your NHS treatment.

At St Mary’s NHS Treatment Centre we offer free NHS treatments to all patients. You are not required to pay if you are an NHS patient and have been referred for treatment by your GP.

We also offer an affordable self pay option for patients who do not have health insurance, or have been told they are ineligible for NHS treatment.

Click here for more information about self pay


Excision of anal lesions

Removal of an area of damaged tissue (lesion) by cutting it out.

EUA of the rectum

Examination Under Anaesthetic (EUA) of the rectum is a means of examining the colon and anal parts of the body using a special instrument in order to diagnose conditions.

Treatment of anal fissure

Anal fissures are tears on the lining of the anus, usually associated with constipation or episodes of severe diarrhoea. If it becomes chronic, it can be painful and bleed profusely. A range of treatments are available (conservative treatment with ointments, botulin toxin injection or lateral sphinterotomy). Either of these improve the blood supply to the fissure, thereby aiding healing.

Treatment of anal fistula

This is a small channel that develops between the end of the bowel (rectum or anal canal) and the skin near the anus (“back passage”), frequently after a perianal abscess that didn’t completely heal. Anal fistulae can be painful and frequently bleed or leak cloudy fluid when you go to the toilet. Surgery is commonly required in these cases.

Treatment of haemorrhoids

There are various surgical treatments for haemorrhoids (piles), depending on the patient’s particular condition. Rubber band ligation, haemorrhoidal artery ligation and haemorrhoidectomy  are some options.

Transanal haemorrhoid dearterialisation (THD)

It uses a Doppler (equipment used to measure blood flow) to locate the terminating branches of the haemorrhoidal arteries. Once the artery is located the surgeon uses an absorbable suture to ligate or “tie-off” the arterial blood flow. The venous “out flow” remains to “shrink” the pile.

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